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Entertaining

A Romantic Early Summer Arrangement by Tinge Floral

Today’s floral arrangement was crafted by Ashley Beyer of Tinge Floral in Salt Lake City who loaded up her studio with all of prettiest blooms in season right now and let her instincts guide the rest. I love the soft pink and orange hues in this arrangement and the winding, wild shapes on display. Ashley’s beautiful work here—and for her many clients all over the country—is a reminder that variety is never a bad thing when building a floral arrangement.

I also love her use of a low, round vase, which makes this arrangement dining-table friendly and adds to the feminine feel of the whole thing. The vessel you choose for your florals always makes such a difference, though it’s easy to focus more on the blooms. I pick up floral-friendly jars, containers, and vases everywhere I go so I always have a lot of options at home. Read on below for Ashley’s notes on recreating this heavenly mix the next time you head to the flower market! XXJKE

Ingredients:

Bearded Iris 

Distant Drum 

Columbine

Honeysuckle

Tree peony

Ranunculus

Tulip

Clematis

The end of spring and beginning of the summer collide in this marriage of ranunculus, bearded iris, garden roses and honeysuckle.

In searching for my materials I looked for slight variances in color to help build a story. While brighter hues can at times be a challenge to navigate, it’s finding those connecting blooms that really pull it all together. I selected blooms of different shapes and sizes as well, which keeps your eye moving throughout the arrangement.

I started this arrangement with the iris, the tallest floral, and worked downward from there. I added in the honeysuckle to create movement and shape, keeping the overall creation asymmetrical. In my arrangements I like to group colors close together and keep likeminded materials in clusters at different planes, mimicking mother nature’s approach. —Ashley Beyer 

Photos: Tess Comrie