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A DIY Facial Steam Recipe from Herbalist Ashley Moore

I love this simple, effective facial steam idea from herbalist Ashley Moore of Women’s Heritage Skillshare in Santa Barbara. Made with a few skin-loving herbs and some hot water, it couldn’t be easier to whip up when you skin is feeling dull, you’re recovering from a cold, or just want to take a few minutes out for some self-care. While the ingredients and instructions are bare bones, the effects of a steam can really be felt and seen instantly. Like a good facial mask, the treatment deep-cleans and brightens the complexion without stripping or drying it out in the process. Read on for Ashley’s recipes and instructions for this restorative treatment, below! XXJKE 

A treat for the senses, facial steams are beautiful to look at, feel wonderful on the skin and in the lungs, and they smell fantastic! They are excellent for the complexion because they open the pores and draw deep impurities to the surface of the skin where they can be released. They bring fresh blood to the face and impart a healthy glow. To make, first choose the flowers and herbs that suit your skin type: 

For dry skin, choose any combination or all of the following: calendula, chamomile, lavender, rose, mallow, plantain, comfrey

For oily skin: calendula, comfrey, plantain, rosemary blossoms or sprigs, red raspberry leaf, sage

To make a big batch that you can store in a glass jar, start with a handful of each herb you are using. Mix in a large bowl and smell your mixture. Adjust if desired. When it smells just right, pour it all into a big glass jar and use once a week.

To prepare your steam, put a handful of your herb mixture into a large bowl. Pour 2-4 cups of just-boiled water over it and give it a stir. Sit down at the table in front of your bowl, put a towel over your head and the bowl and breathe in the steam for 5-10 minutes. Follow with a spritz of toner and a little moisturizer. 

To make just enough for one facial steam, use a tablespoon of each herb you are using and just put it directly into your large “steaming” bowl.

Photos: Lauren Ross